But We Have Always Done It This Way

I love traditions. I picked my mother’s and my great aunt’s silver pattern and my grandmother’s pearls are probably my most prized possession. That same grandmother used Palmolive to wash dishes and I have a big bottle of the green stuff under my kitchen sink. We have had turkey and dressing for Thanksgiving and Christmas all of my life and I intend to serve that menu for the rest of my days. I like traditional worship, I still wear panty hose and I like antiques. Almost everything I do in my life from how much allowance my 5 year old gets to what brand of toilet paper I buy is grounded in tradition. So why is it that the following 8 words….But we have always done it this way… stop me in my tracks when I hear a business owner or executive say them? Because being grounded in tradition is one thing, staying in a rut is completely another.

The world of marketing and public relations changes on a daily basis. I was at a meeting today of the Lee County Chapter of the Public Relations Council of Alabama. Two young women who are recent graduates of Auburn University presented their Campaign Class project to us. They worked with Fox Sports U and NASCAR to create a campaign to engage the coveted 18-34yo market using primarily social media. Out of several proposals, theirs was chosen to implement. I cannot do the full project justice, but a brief synopsis is that NASCAR is currently followed by mostly 44-67year old men. NASCAR and Fox Sports U see that they have to expand their audience and they have to remain cutting edge on their messaging to engage new and younger fans and viewers. While I was sitting listening to these bright, young women it struck me that tradition has a place in marketing and PR. Tradition in marketing, advertising and PR is your brand. It is the core of who you are and what your values are. It does not change often, if ever. How you relay that message and educate people on your brand is what has to be dynamic and changing with the times. NASCAR stayed true to their culture and who they are, but by working with these students, they added another way in which to reach viewers and potential fans. They did not let “but we have always done it that way” lead the way to complacency and lost revenue.

I worked for a small consulting firm for years beginning in 2002. We did not have voicemail for almost a year after I started. The COO was terrified that clients would see voicemail as a move to be less customer service oriented and excellent customer service was a core value that was measured at this firm. What she did not understand was that people were so used to voicemail by that time that they were hesitant to leave messages with a live human for fear that the nuance of the message may be lost or it may not get to the intended recipient. Because she had always taken hand written messages and dug her heals in so deep, she failed to consider how the person on the other end of the phone felt about voicemail. She wanted to maintain her core value of excellent customer service, but was not considering that the perception of what makes customer service great had changed over time. Business owners have to honor the traditions that work for their enterprises and further brand awareness, but they must also be willing to try new ways to reach clients and potential clients. If Lemonade Social can help you stay true to your traditions, while exploring new ways communicate your core values, please let us know!